Upcoming Releases to Get Excited About | Part 2

2018 is coming closer and closer to the end and here I am with another three 2019 releases to get excited about and or possibly bemoan the wait period for depending on whether you’re a glass half full or empty kinda person.

Image result for a curse so dark and lonelyA Curse so Dark and Lonely – Brigid Kemmerer | 29th Jan

Fall in love, break the curse. 

It once seemed so easy to Prince Rhen, the heir to Emberfall. Cursed by a powerful enchantress to repeat the autumn of his eighteenth year over and over, he knew he could be saved if a girl fell for him. But that was before he learned that at the end of each autumn, he would turn into a vicious beast hell-bent on destruction. That was before he destroyed his castle, his family, and every last shred of hope.

Nothing has ever been easy for Harper Lacy. With her father long gone, her mother dying, and her brother barely holding their family together while constantly underestimating her because of her cerebral palsy, she learned to be tough enough to survive. But when she tries to save someone else on the streets of Washington, DC, she’s instead somehow sucked into Rhen’s cursed world.

Break the curse, save the kingdom. 

A prince? A monster? A curse? Harper doesn’t know where she is or what to believe. But as she spends time with Rhen in this enchanted land, she begins to understand what’s at stake. And as Rhen realizes Harper is not just another girl to charm, his hope comes flooding back. But powerful forces are standing against Emberfall . . . and it will take more than a broken curse to save Harper, Rhen, and his people from utter ruin.


Anyone who knows me well knows that I love Beauty and the Beast. LOVE. While there have been quite a lot of retellings of it over the years (some better than others), based on the blurb, this one sounds great. Also, a strong, modern heroine with a disability? Um, yes! I’ve seen a few really positive early reviews so I’m hoping this will end up being a winner. However, my one nagging feeling is that someone mentioned that if you liked A Court of Thorns and Roses, you’d enjoy this one. Even though I ended up really loving that series, the first book was a bit average for me. Guess we’ll see.

Add on Goodreads

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36307634King of Scars – Leigh Bardugo | 29th Jan

Nikolai Lantsov has always had a gift for the impossible. No one knows what he endured in his country’s bloody civil war—and he intends to keep it that way. Now, as enemies gather at his weakened borders, the young king must find a way to refill Ravka’s coffers, forge new alliances, and stop a rising threat to the once-great Grisha Army.

Yet with every day a dark magic within him grows stronger, threatening to destroy all he has built. With the help of a young monk and a legendary Grisha Squaller, Nikolai will journey to the places in Ravka where the deepest magic survives to vanquish the terrible legacy inside him. He will risk everything to save his country and himself. But some secrets aren’t meant to stay buried—and some wounds aren’t meant to heal. 


Another big name release that I couldn’t resist including. At the beginning of this month I re-read Shadow and Bone and then actually made it the rest of the way through The Grisha trilogy. Now, like everyone else, I’m so excited for this one. Pretty much everybody who reads the Grisha books falls in love with Nikolai and although he was different to what I expected (in a good way!), I did too. It’ll be great to see him take centre stage this time and find out how he handles Ravka after everything that happened with Alina and The Darkling. He’s also got some trauma of his own to process, too, so that’ll be interesting. Even better, both Zoya and, love of my life, the waffle queen herself, Nina Zenik, will be in this series. I’m sure there’ll be a love interest there somewhere. Unsure how I feel about it though. Regardless, hurry up January!

Add on Goodreads

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Image result for even if i fallEven if I Fall – Abigail Johnson | 8th Jan

A year ago, Brooke Covington lost everything when her beloved older brother, Jason, confessed to the murder of his best friend, Calvin. Brooke and her family became social pariahs, broken and unable to console one another. Brooke’s only solace remains the ice-skating rink, where she works but no longer lets herself dream about a future skating professionally.

When Brooke encounters Calvin’s younger brother, Heath, on the side of the road and offers him a ride, everything changes. She needs someone to talk to…and so does Heath. No one else understands what it’s like. Her brother, alive but gone; his brother, dead but everywhere. Soon, they’re meeting in secret, despite knowing that both families would be horrified if they found out. In the place of his anger and her guilt, something frighteningly tender begins to develop, drawing them ever closer together.

But when a new secret comes out about the murder, Brooke has to choose whose pain she’s willing to live with—her family’s or Heath’s. Because she can’t heal one without hurting the other.


So, I’m pretty sure this book is going to cause some intense heart break. It’s got deep, emotional YA contemporary written all over it but at the same time there’s a bit of a mystery element which I’m really here for (please don’t be disappointing!!). I really like this idea of showcasing human connection and compassion with regards to such a super complicated relationship. I mean, if someone’s sibiling had murdered your brother, the last thing you’d want is to hang around with them as a constant reminder of that fact. At the same time though, it’s not their fault. Ah! This is going to be so messy.

Add on Goodreads

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Are any of these on your 2019 TBR? Or if you’ve been lucky enough to get your hands on an ARC, how was it?

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Top 10 Tuesday: Backlist Books I Want to Read

I’mmmmm backkkk! It’s been about a month and here I am again, ready to get stuck into some Top Ten Tuesday fun.

Is it just me, or are there about a zillion and one amazing looking books released every few months? I go to cross one anticipated release off my TBR list only to find I have to add five more to it. For this reason, it’s pretty easy to get caught up in new releases and neglect the poor book babies which have been angrily screaming, ‘You promised to read me last month’ for about five years.

I also need to consider that every so often I find my reading tastes and interests change or expand a little. This tends to open my eyes up to a whole bunch of amazing books from years ago which I may not have been aware of before. For example, I only really started getting into YA contemporaries last year which means I have a lot of catching up to do in terms of the super popular books in that category.

Here are ten books published at least 2 years ago which I’d like to read at some point:

Image result for siege and stormSiege & Storm – Leigh Bardugo (2013)

I now own all three books, and having finally done my re-read of Shadow and Bone at the end of October, I’m planning to push on to Siege & Storm soon. I’m looking forward to finally getting a proper introduction to Nikolai, who people can’t seem to discuss without swooning. I didn’t mind book one but I wasn’t in love with it. Still, I’m willing to give the rest of the series a go because 1) Leigh is awesome and 2) I’d really like to read King of Scars when it comes out.

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Related imageFangirl – Rainbow Rowell (2013)

As I mentioned above, I only jumped on the YA contemporary bandwagon last year so I’m still working my way through the so called holy grail books of the genre. Fangirl seems to be one of them. Weirldy enough, I’ve already read Carry On which came after (and only because of) this book so it’ll be interesting reading the fan fiction sections. Hopefully I find it as cute and relatable as people (constanty) keep saying it is. I mean, I am a bit of a hermit and I have written fan fiction so the odds are in its favour.

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28165439The Long Walk – Richard Bachman aka. Stephen King (1979)

I’m not entirely sure how I stumbled across this one. I think I may have been googling lists of the best Stephen King books? (Totally normal bookworm behaviour, of course). This one peaked my interest. It’s about a race in which 100 boys have to keep walking above a certain speed for as long as possible. They have three warnings and if they exceed them, they get murdered. Winner gets whatever their heart desires. It sounds super dark but really compelling. It’s also a reasonable length, unlike some of King’s more famous pieces, but then again, he published this one under a pseudonum. I’m hoping it’s an interesting read.

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10576365The Darkest Minds – Alexandra Bracken (2012)

I’ve mentioned this one on some other lists recently so apologies for being an uncreative and repetitious dork. I was never super motivated to actually read TDM until the movie came out but everyone raves about these books so I think I need to find out what the fusss is about. Also POWERS. I LOVE POWERS! I’m hoping to find some loveable characters but I’m a little worried about the book just feeling like every other dystopian YA I’ve read. I also tend to get bored with over the top military/government organisation involvement in certain kinds of stories so fingers crossed it doesn’t happen with this one.

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16069030The Winner’s Curse – Marie Rutkoski (2014)

This series seems to come up a lot in YA fantasy/dystopian circles, especially when people are talking favourite ships. I’ll admit, the books look a little trashy – the covers give me some serious The Selection vibes (which my guilty pleasure lovin’ self had sooooo much fun with) and I’m worried there will be a heap of tropes, instalove and a lack of proper development. STILL my curious brain cannot be dissuaded. I have to do it. I’m hoping they end up being as enjoyable as everyone says. If so, they’re short reads and they’ll look gorgeous in my bookshelf, triple win!!

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10626594The Scorpio Races – Maggie Stiefvater (2011)

I’ve lost track of how many times I’ve been in the bookstore, picked this one up, thought about buying it and then decided to hold off. The plot sounds really exciting (intense live-or-die race involving water horses? Um, Yes!) and I’ve heard a heap of good things about it (it’s slow but really atmospheric and poignant). Plus, it’s a standalone so no need to wait years for pesky sequels which may or may not live up to expectations. I may not always adore Maggie’s books but I have to admit that she always has interesting characters and concepts.

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943402Let the Right One In – John Ajvide Lindqvist (2009)

I’ve been curious about this one ever since I saw the american adaptation years back. I’ve now seen both the Swedish and US versions so I’d really like to read the source material to see how it compares. After how romanticised vampires have become in literature over the years, it’ll be cool to read something with a darker, scarier, and more violent approach towards them. I’ve heard it’s quite intense and creepy so it should be a good change of pace.

 

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Image result for the name of the windThe Name of the Wind – Patrick Rothfuss (2007)

I’ve been putting this one off for a very long time for three reasons. First, it’s not a small book  and 2018 Ashley seems to find that frightening. Second, I’ve heard it takes some time to really grab you. Third, it’s taking Rothfuss FOREVER to write the series, and who needs that pain and suffering in their life? However, pretty much everyone who loves fantasy has really enjoyed this series and I’m looking forward to seeing what all the hype is about. Please don’t end up being boring and disappointing.

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Image result for the well of ascensionThe Well of Ascension – Brandon Sanderson (2007)

I’ve had this book in my bookcase for a few years now and I keep putting it off because I know I’ll need to re-read The Final Empire before I read it. My memory is basically swiss cheese these days and I remember nothing about book one. Okay, nothing other than the fact that the magic system is super cool and that Sanderson actually surprised me by killing off a major character before the climax. This is another series everyone who loves the fantasy genre gushes about. I enjoyed the first book and it’ll be interesting to see where the series goes after how it ended. Sanderson is a really amazing writer so it’ll be nice to get some more exposure to him.

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Image result for since you've been goneSince You’ve Been Gone – Morgan Matson (2011)

Morgan Matson is another one of those YA contemporary authors that people seem to really enjoy. I read the blurb of this one and though it’d be a great choice for my first book of hers. The cover gives me such Summer vibes so don’t be surprised if this one shows up on a summer reads related post later on. I really love reading about well written female friendships in books and it seems ike Since You’ve Been Gone will have one at it’s core. Give me some cute moments and make me feel all the feelings, pretty please!


What are some of the backlist books sitting on your TBR at the moment? Why haven’t you gotten around to them yet? Perhaps you’re like me and keep getting distracted by shiny, pretty new releases! 

Let’s Go Save the World: Wonder Woman: Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo

3.5 stars
WW

If you’re looking for a badass female character, it’s hard to go past the amazingness that is Diana Prince, aka. WONDER WOMAN. She’s strong, brave, looks fantastic in red boots, can use a whip like it’s nobody’s business, and has the kindest heart. What more can you ask for? I mean, look at her:
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Ultimate girl crush.

For this reason I was so excited to get my hands on Wonder Woman: Warbringer. I mean Diana and Leigh Bardugo? Now that’s match up! Which is why I eagerly bought the book and then tore into it like 30 seconds later.

Kidding.

I put it on my shelf and didn’t pick it up again for about six months.

Yep, sounds completely logical to me too.

Moving along, I have read it now! *Dances* So here’s the gist physicist:

WW:W, much like the 2017 film, is a Diana origin story. In this book Diana is seventeen, living her life on Thermiskyra, and is constantly reminded that she is not in fact a true Amazon. In typical hero fashion, she’s keen to get out into the world, quest it up and prove her bad-ass ness (okay, fine, it might be her heroic-ness).

Enter Alia, a teen from New York City on holiday with some friends when her boat explodes right near the Amazonians’ border. Just like in the movie, except replace Steve with Alia, Diana dives into the sea and rescues her. Except, major problem: Alia is a Warbringer, a descendant of Helen of Troy and part of a blood line that causes immense conflict to break out in the world whenever one of them comes of age. Guess who’ll be having the right numbered birthday soon?

In other words, it’s QUEST TIME. Diana sets out with Alia, and several others, in search of a mystical spring in Greece in the hopes of curing Alia of her warbringerness before the next moon cycle. As you can imagine, hijinks ensue.

Why You Should Read This Book:

Shield Sisters

“Sister in battle,” murmured Diana, “I am shield and blade to you.”
“And friend.”
“And always your friend.”

The friendship in this book, guys. The FRIENDSHIP. It’s lovely to see and so empowering! The central women in the novel are all well developed and very different from one another. They have each other’s backs whilst still recognising the ability of the others to take care of themselves. They encourage each other to believe in themselves and to go outside their comfort zones, but most importantly, they trust in each other’s decisions.

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As with any book of this kind, we get the big moments, the physical displays of friendship, but the best moments are the quieter ones – the conversations between Diana, Alia and Nim which showcase their hopes, fears and sadness.

Boredom? Nah.

Something Leigh really gets right with this book is that it’s constantly moving. It might not always be in a way you’d like or be guns blazing and car chases (okay, maybe in the second half it is) but there’s a sense of direction and progress right from the beginning. The action picks up in the second half – army dudes, epic plane escapes, god possessions and big fight sequences – but still allows for some nice character development and sweet moments between our heroes.

All Shapes and Sizes…And Ethnicities, and Sexualities, and everything really!

This book is a diversity dream. There’s a little bit of everything thrown in with this cast of characters and it creates a wonderful dynamic. Plus, Leigh doesn’t shy away from commentary on important topics like racism, body image, and growing up LBQTI. For example, there’s a scene in which Alia and Diana are in Target, Alia with missing shoes. She explains to Diana the necessity of getting in and out quickly because she’s bound to be targeted for a theft check based on her colour. Like, man, what can I even say to that?

Leigh, I ❤️ You

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Something that rarely ever ceases to shine is Leigh’s writing. Her descriptions aren’t overdone, and character internalisation is balanced well against occurring events. Her dialogue is smooth and always seems to achieve the right tone, whether that be dramatic or amusing, without feeling forced. Also important in a book like this, Leigh’s conflict scenes are well written and very easy to follow. It’s not hard to see why she’s so popular amongst YA readers (myself included!).

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Why you Might Want to Skip It

The Darkling, This Villain Ain’t

For most of WW:W there isn’t really an antagonist we can point to as being a major bad guy. Sure, there are elements that pose challenges for our heroes but overall there’s no clear cut individual or body (which is something I think the book could have benefited from).

That is, until the climax of the novel.

And let’s just say, I wasn’t mighty impressed with the antagonist or their motivations.

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To be blunt, they felt a bit ridiculous. I actually didn’t predict the twist but despite the impact it should have had, I couldn’t muster the energy to care, likely because I wasn’t too interested in this particular character. I kind of just sat there going, really mate? Really? However, points for a satisfying defeat of said individual using both Diana’s smarts and strength.

Modern Setting

This is more a personal preference. In the comics, Diana’s story begins in a WWII setting and in the film, it’s WWI. WW:W is set in the modern world and for some reason I’m a little sad at the loss of a historical setting. I know, the contemporary setting was crucial to a lot of Leigh’s story and the issues she addressed, but somehow Diana riding the subway just doesn’t have the same appeal as us joining her in the wonder of discovering wartime London.

Silly Story Elements

While Leigh is good, she isn’t infallible. There were a few small elements of WW:W that came up on occasion which broke the flow of the book slightly by coming off cartoonish. The villain aside, the prime example was Leigh’s use of the war based gods, with their random appearances often feeling pointless and silly. I mean, possessions followed by some cackling and taunting? Um…nope.

Diana, is that You?

As I mentioned earlier, Diana is a great character. So, one of my main issues with this book is that for large chunks of it, Diana’s character felt a little…flat, as though it could have been any unmemorable YA protagonist filling her shoes. Yes, it’s an origin story and I know Diana isn’t Wonder Woman yet, but I still expected more of a spark in her character. There were moments where I felt as if she simply faded into the background or I forgot completely who she was supposed to be. However, in Leigh’s defence, this improved in the second half and, thank goodness, righted completely by the time the climax kicked into gear.

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I enjoyed Leigh’s take on Diana and whilst I think there could have been a few improvements, I’d recommend it to anyone who’s a fan of Wonder Woman or looking for a fun read with some great, diverse characters.

My only problem: the end has left me with a craving for Bardugo’s take on actual Wonder Woman. Damn, that ending is such a teaser!

3.5 Stars

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What did you guys think of Wonder Woman: Warbringer?

Love Ashley

 

Let’s Talk: The Five-Star Novel Checklist

Recently I’ve been feeling the strong urge to try and resurrect my efforts to write a novel. I’ve had the same idea for years and years now, always remaining in the planning stage, but I constantly lose motivation after coming up against wall after wall after wall of PLOT HOLES. Regardless, I’ve been thinking hard about what it is that my favourite reads seem to include or do right and these are just a couple of things I’ve noticed:

Image result for check boxLayered & Complex Characters

This applies to both heroes and villains alike. I don’t want to read about completely pure of heart main characters from which the sun shines out of every orifice, without weaknesses, demons or quirks. It’s flipping BORING. I want to see people push through vulnerabilities, fail on occasion, and sometimes make the wrong choices. They’re a work in progress, constantly being shaped by the events of the story and the characters around them. This is why anti-heroes are so popular these days. Everyone enjoys a little unpredictability in their protagonists and there’s nothing better than watching someone grow as a person during the course of a novel.

The same goes for the antagonist of the story. Even though I don’t necessarily agree with what that group or individual is doing, I want to be able to understand it – to sympathise. Depth is important. If they’re an awful person, how did they come to be that way? What are the stakes for them? I mean, it’s not like they popped out the womb that way. Crazy men who just want to watch the world burn only work in certain circumstances. Okay, just one – this guy:

Image result for the joker gif animated series

That’s about it.  Everyone else better have some realistic motivations.  There is absolutely no logic to having a villain who wants to end the world just cause.

Image result for check boxHumour

I tend to read a lot of fantasy novels in which the characters are forced to come up against some pretty dramatic and trying circumstances. So, things can get pretty dour without the occasional burst of humour. I’m a massive fan of the occasional witty throw-away line of dialogue, burning comebacks and sarcastic retorts, or recurring inside jokes. What would Cassandra Clare’s shadow hunter stories be without their amusing exchanges between the characters. For example:

“Do you remember back at the hotel when you promised that if we lived, you’d get dressed up in a nurse’s outfit and give me a sponge bath?” asked Jace.

“It was Simon who promised you the sponge bath.”

“As soon as I’m back on my feet, handsome,” said Simon.

“I knew we should have left you a rat.”

_______________

“We came to see Jace. Is he alright?”
“I don’t know,” Magnus said. “Does he normally just lie on the floor like that without moving?”

Image result for check boxPlot Twists & Unpredictable Events

Without sounding like an arrogant ass, I’m someone who is usually quite good at predicting how stories will turn out. Usually this is because there are certain lines that most authors refuse to cross e.g. they won’t kill off main characters, they want their key characters to be at the centre of their plot twists, so on and so forth. There’s nothing I love more than reaching a moment in a book that I did not see coming and which sends my mind reeling.

Game of Thrones, in its early books, is a great example in that George RR Martin was willing to brutally murder off many of the characters his readers thought were here for the long haul (we know much better now, of course).

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The first instalment in Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn series is another book that managed to get me, while the twist three-quarters in Amy Kaufman and Jay Kristoff’s Illuminae also hit me real hard *shakes fist at sky*.

I will say though that even if I’m able to predict a plot twist, I’m perfectly okay with it as long as it makes sense and it’s entertaining. The last thing I want is to accidently roll my eyes out of my head at the complete cliché-ness of it all.

Image result for check boxA Gradually Developed Romantic Relationship

As much as I’d love to be able to say: who needs romance, I can’t because the majority (not ALL, but the majority) of my favourite books involve a romantic relationship in some form or another. I really enjoy having some variation in the dynamics between characters. I want something to root for, to ship! However, when I say romance, I do not mean insta-love. One of the things that annoys me the most about romantic relationships in books is how often authors fail to properly develop it before the characters are dropping the ‘L’ bomb and diving headfirst into danger to save the other person. Insta-lust, totally cool. Love, nope, nope, I’m out.

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I’m looking for a gradual build up and an understanding of one another. More importantly, I don’t want the relationship to serve to damage or limit the involved characters. If it’s a story intending to show off a toxic relationship, that’s fine as it’s another kind of plot all together. But if this is something you’ve been dangling in front of my face for an extended period like the carrot before a donkey and it involves two characters I already love, the last thing I want is to see them reduced to shadows of their former selves. In other words, no “I forbid you to do that” or stupid, petty actions that are ridiculously out of character. A perfect example of this is Sarah J Maas’s relationship between Feyre and Rhysand in A Court of Mist and Fury (however, not all authors have the luxury of spending the majority of a 600 page book developing their romances). Also important is that the relationship serves to add to the entertainment of the story, not make me want to bash my head against a wall in frustration.

Image result for check boxFantastic Friendships

I mentioned romantic relationships earlier but friendships or close bonds between characters are another must for me in books. I love, love, love watching small groups of people with strong ties come together to support one another or fight against a greater threat. As you read, you can’t help but feel a part of the social circle yourself – whether it be a group of mothers as they support each other through domestic violence, false accusations of school bullying and general feelings of inadequacy in Liane Moriarty’s Big Little Lies, or a gang of thieves as they attempt to rake in money for their own selfish exploits as in Six of Crows or The Lies of Locke Lamora.

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Where would Eragon have been without the wise-cracking dwarf, Orik, or Gansey without Blue and the rest of the Raven Boys? Exciting plots may be one of the biggest parts of a great novel, but the best bits are the smaller movements between characters.

Image result for check boxExciting World Building

There is nothing I love better than falling into an original and amazing new world – one full of possibility, secrets, histories, maybe even magic. You know a world is great when you’re lapping up any chance to see more of it. Part of the wonder of the A Darker Shade of Magic books, for me, was the excitement of having so many different versions of the same city scattered through different dimensions. And then on top of that were the parts of Kell’s world alone which we never got to see. Leigh Bardugo’s Grishaverse was so wonderful that people were willing to read a whole different set of books just to see more of it. Meanwhile, Tolkien basically began the modern fantasy genre with the creation of Middle Earth. Never underestimate the power of an expertly crafted world. Just don’t rub my face in every little unnecessary detail of it (I’m looking at you, Tolkien).


I could sit here and talk for ages about more common threads like magic and training sequences but we’d be here forever. So I’ll leave it for now.

What characteristics do your favourite novels tend to have? It could be anything, small or big! General or specific! action sequences, poignant writing, wars, multiple character perspectives, a romantic relationship between best friends – what’s something that makes you fall in love with a story? I ask totally not to help me in my writing pursuits *cough*…

Love ash 2

 

Top 10 Tuesday: Villains, Criminals & Other Nasties

As usual, TTT is a weekly meme by the The Broke and the Bookish and it’s currently on hiatus so that means picking whatever takes my fancy from the list of previous topics. This week I’m doing villains. In no particular order here are some of what I consider to be the best:

Voldemort (Harry Potter Series –  J. K. Rowling)

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Snake-like face, soul split into multiple pieces in order to cheat death, set on murdering teenagers year after year… yep, as if I wasn’t going to put him on this list.

Ramsey Bolton (A Song of Ice and Fire – George RR Martin)

I’d wager that when you think about the crappiest of the Song of Ice and Fire villains your mind either jumps to a) Joffrey Baratheon or b) this little shit:

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When your favourite past times include flaying, raping, dismemberment, and feeding people to your dogs, you definitely deserve a spot on a top 10 villains list.

It or Pennywise (It – Stephen King)

Books don’t usually manage to scare me, but I’ll admit that for most of this novel I was a little bit nervous. If you aren’t afraid of clowns, this’ll help you understand why someone could be. A creepy, clown shaped, ancient entity that can make your worst fears a reality and spends his time eating children…

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Nope. Nope. Nope. I’m out.

Amy Dunn (Gone Girl – Gillian Flynn)

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I wish I could find a better way to describe Amy than this, but here it is: This bitch be crazy. Like verging on sociopath material. In a book full of shades of grey characters, it’s saying something that Amy’s able to stand out. I won’t say much about the why and how because SPOILERS but trust me, she belongs here for a reason.

The Darkling (Shadow & Bone – Leigh Bardugo)

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This is probably one of the few likeable villains on my list. And by likeable I mean I actually sat around thinking: if this guy basically succeeded in killing everyone else in the book right now, I’d probably be cool with that. That is some solid charisma right there. I can’t even explain it, he’s evil. Really, really evil. But do I like him more than the love interest? Yep, 100%.

Count Olaf (A Series of Unfortunate Events – Lemony Snicket)

 jim carrey a series of unfortunate events jim carrey gif count olaf mine gifs GIF

Count Olaf isn’t what you’d call a successful villain but you do have to give him points for determination. No matter how many times he’s defeated by three intelligent orphans, he’s back at it in the next book with another not so brilliant plan, a terrible disguise, and and high levels of self-confidence.

 

Annie (Misery – Stephen King)

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The second of the two King villains on this list. Anyone who will smash your legs with a sledgehammer to get you to write a novel, uses individual hairs as a security system, and can survive being hit in the head with a typewriter is someone to be very, very afraid of. Annie is, to put it bluntly, freakin’ crazy.

Hannibal Lecter (Silence of the Lambs, Hannibal – Thomas Harris)

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I love intelligent villains. Sure, crazy ones are fun on occasion but having a villain that actually poses a challenge for the hero in more than just a physical sense is fantastic. Hannibal is a great example of this. He’s articulate, calculating, suave, and well, happens to be a cannibal. While he’s not actually the central villain of either of these novels, there’s never a moment when you’re not wondering exactly what’s going on inside his head and suspecting that it’s something sinister.

The White Witch (The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe – C. S. Lewis)

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Anyone who can manage to turn sweets into something dodgy is bad news in my books. Sure, there’s the turning people into ice sculptures, killing Aslan, stopping the change of seasons and well, kind of removing all joy from the world, but honestly, for me, her biggest act of villainy is probably stopping Christmas from ever happening. How dare she! I LOVE Christmas.

The Witch King of Angmar (The Lord of the Rings – J.R.R. Tolkien)

So originally I was going to put Sauron in this spot but then I realised that he kind of does stuff all and just sits around on his fiery butt while everyone else does all the work for him. And then we have this guy…

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Head of the Nazgul, rides a massive dragon-like creature, almost kills Frodo with a poisoned blade, wields a mace like a nutjob, and is just generally creepy as all hell. No man can kill this guy. Lucky we had Eowyn.

The Six of Crows Book Tag

No Mourners, No Funerals

I’m sure there have been a whole heap of these already (including the booktube one which honestly didn’t really float my boat) but I’ve decided to do it anyway.  It’s been on my mind for ages to create my own Six of Crows tag. I’ve never made a tag before and I really love Six of Crows, so why not just go for it? The characters in Six of Crows are so diverse and fantastic that they just scream book tag so here they are – 6 characters, 6 questions. Sounds easy, right?

Rules:

  1. Link back to my blog, The Infinite Library, so I can check out your answers!
  2. Thank the person who tagged you.
  3. Answer the questions
  4. Tag as many or as few people as you wish to spread the fun and Six of Crows love

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The Thief

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KAZ BREKKER: A LAYERED OR COMPLEX CHARACTER

Holland – A Darker Shade of Magic Series by V. E. Schwab: Holland’s an interesting character in that you’re unsure for quite a while as to what his nature truly is. A Conjuring of Light was great in that we learnt more about Holland’s history and how he came to be where he was when we first began the series. He’s a character far more on the grey scale than Kell due to the nature of the life he’s led. Although Holland’s means aren’t always the purest, deep down his intentions are good.


The Wraith

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INEJ GHAFA: A BOOK WITH A TWIST YOU DIDN’T SEE COMING

Illuminae by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff – There’s a twist about two thirds of the way through which I really wasn’t expecting. It turned out not to be true later on but at the time, I was so shocked. I couldn’t believe I’d been so easily manipulated for so many chapters, much like one the main characters. Pesky AI…


The Sharpshooter

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JESPER FAHEY: AN AUTHOR THAT NEVER MISSES THE MARK

I’m going to cheat a little here and say Richelle Mead for this because until I read Soundless, I absolutely loved every book of hers I’d ever read and trust me when I say that her books take up a good shelf and a half of my bookcase all on their own.


The Heartrender

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NINA ZENIK: A BOOK THAT BROKE YOUR HEART OR GAVE YOU ALL THE FEELS

My Sister’s Keeper – Jodi Picoult: This book was a roller coaster emotionally. The characters are written so well that you feel everything they do as if they were your own family. And just when you reach the end and you think it’s all over, the story punches you in the gut with the most devastating moment ever. I cried, massively. Then I re-read the book a few years later, and cried again. The final chapter was an absolute sob-fest.

Also special mention to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: So many character deaths plus having to deal with it being the end to one of my favourite series ever. * cries*


The Convict

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MATTHIAS HELVAR: A CHARACTER CAUGHT BETWEEN TWO WORLDS

Two for the price of one for this question.

Simon Lewis – The Mortal Instruments by Cassandra Clare: Simon is a vampire and thus a downworlder. This makes things a little tricky as the members of his close circle of relationships are nearly all shadowhunters who don’t always have the best interactions with the downworlder community. Finding his place in between the two sides and working out where to stand on certain issues is a constant challenge for him but it also adds interesting conflict to his storylines.

Eugiene Markham (Dark Swan Series): Eugenie is a shaman, which means she’s paid to deal with troublesome fey who make their way into the human world. However once she becomes queen of a fairy dominion, things become very messy. She often faces difficulty reconciling the needs of her fey subjects with what she knows to be the right thing to do for humans. And of course, the fact that her two potential love interests also fall on different sides of the equation makes it even harder.


The Explosives Expert

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WYLAN VAN ECK: A BOOK THAT WENT OUT WITH A BANG OR A CLIFF-HANGER

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins – It was all happening at the end of this book. We had a massive lightning bolt blow up an arena, Katniss being rescued by the resistance, finding out about the existence of District 13, Peta’s capture, and a whole host of other things. Definitely a bang.

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And there you have it!

If you feel like engaging in a little bit of Six of Crows tagging fun, I tag you! Go forth and enjoy! Otherwise, here are nine lovely people I tag to share in the fun. As usual, if you don’t want to or don’t usually do these, I completely get it.

Nadwa @ Painfully Fictional

Mandy @ Book Princess Reviews

Raven @ Dreamy Addictions

Jackie @  Too Much of a Book Nerd (Maybe this will push her to actually read it!)

Nicole @ Live Life Reading (Same for you, Nicole!)

Judith @ Chain Interaction

Emma @ A Dreamer’s Library

Kawther @ The Villain Library

Sydney @ Fire and Rain Books