Let’s Talk: The Types of Blog Posts I Enjoy Reading Most

As a book blogger, I’m always trying to come up with interesting and different post ideas to explore. However, I also have a selection of post types that are favourites of mine to write. But are the posts I enjoy writing also the ones I gravitate towards the most as a reader? Well, yes and no. On occasion, I do find that there are some types of posts I really enjoy reading from others which I find tedious to write myself. Then, on the flip side, there are posts that I like writing even though I know I’m unlikely to read something similar from another blogger. Bizarre, but that’s the truth. So, here are the categories of book blog posts that I find I enjoy/click on the most.

Lists/Rankings

Now, this is a type of post that I both enjoy writing and reading. From a reader perspective, it’s always fun to see how other bookworms rank or organise certain books (or things connected to them) in relation to specific topics. You get a lot of insight into the types of books, narratives and characters bloggers enjoy and there’s nothing like finding someone else who has the same favourites as you do. Even better, a lot of the time I end up finding new books to read because people have spoken so passionately about them or ranked them so highly.

Book Reviews for Anticipated or New Releases

When it comes to singular book reviews, I tend to only check out book blogs for those dealing with new or upcoming releases. Sorry, guys! Normally it’s because I’ve been looking forward to these books and am interested in reading a somewhat lengthier and more in depth review about them. I know this isn’t the best approach as it means I’m cutting myself off from potentially being introduced to some amazing backlist books I have yet to hear about. Unfortunately, it’s just the way I am. Despite often writing backlist book reviews for my own blog, I find that I usually source my reviews for these types of books in bulk through Goodreads (in other words, if you’d like to be GR friends, hit me up & I will happily read your backlist book reviews!).

Wrap Ups/Mini Book Reviews

Being someone with questionable patience and a short attention span at times (I’m flawed, I know), I really appreciate a good wrap up or mini-reviews post. I love getting a broad overview of what others have been reading and seeing people’s brief thoughts on a bunch of different books. I’m not especially picky when it comes to the types of books covered, but I do tend to click on posts which feature books I recognise. Personally, I always find writing wrap ups and mini reviews tough because once I get stuck into writing a review, the words keep spewing out. Luckily many bloggers are much better at this than I am.

Book Tags

Like lists, this is another post that falls under the ‘enjoy reading and writing’ heading. It’s purely because they’re so much fun and, again, give you insight into bloggers’ favourite things. Depending on the prompts, the way certain tags are answered can also encourage me add books to my TBR for particular tropes, character types or qualities that I would never have known about just by reading the blurb. Tags with quirky themes which link into my other interests are super enjoyable, too, particularly when they involve prompts that are tricky or different from the norm. Bonus interest points for when people try their hand at creating new tags.

Book Hauls & TBRs

My reason for enjoying these types of posts is extremely simple: I love seeing what other people are excited to read! There’s something so uplifting about seeing a stack of books that you just had to splurge on because they all sounded so wonderful or a list of titles that you can’t wait to get stuck into this month, hoping they’ll all be 5 stars. I especially enjoy when that excitement rubs off on me and I end up going out to pick up one of those same books for myself. Added bonus, these types of posts are usually quick, easy reads and great for when you only have limited time to check in with other bloggers.

Blogging Guides & How To Posts

I’ve been blogging for a few years now so I have a basic understanding about many of the things associated with it (emphasis on basic though, very basic). But, there are always so many new things for me to learn and others that I could improve or be doing better at. This is where the experience of other amazing bloggers comes into play. I love reading helpful posts with tips and guides on content, graphics, photography, SEO, and everything you can possibly think of that could assist me on my blogging journey. Blogging can be hard work sometimes and it doesn’t always pay off in the way you hope, so it’s great to find a post to assist you in better achieving your goals and making you feel a bit less stupid.


Everyone enjoys something different so I know not all of my most enjoyable types of posts to read will be the same as yours. What are your favourite types of posts? Are there any post categories that you actively avoid?

Let’s Talk: About Sex, Baby…in YA Fiction (Part 2)

Once upon a time, in the land of 2018, I wrote a post about the incorporation of sex into young adult fiction. Unsurprisingly for anything with the word ‘sex’ in the title, it’s one of the most popular posts on this blog. Except, funny story, it was always intended to be a two-parter. Better late than never, right? While part one dealt with the questions of whether sex should be included/discussed at all in YA books and if so, to what to degree of depth, here I’ll be looking at how I think sexual content should be represented/depicted.

Lacking Pornographic Perfection

Funny Sex GIF

Let’s get the big one out of the way first. Despite what Hollywood seems to want us to believe, sex is not a perfectly choreographed porno. It can be messy, awkward, unsatisfying, painful, scary and, because no one ever seems to want to show it as such, not what people expect it to be. This is especially true your first time with a new partner and more so your first time ever, a common thing for characters in YA lit.

The whole affair was the precise opposite of what I figured it would be: slow and patient and quiet and neither particularly painful nor particularly ecstatic. […] No headboards were broken. No screaming. Honestly, it was probably the longest time we’d ever spent together without talking.

‘The Fault in Our Stars’ – John Green

Although adult romances might often feature passionate and perfect sex where everyone orgasms simultaneously and feels perfectly blissful afterwards, this isn’t really a realistic way to depict sex in YA books. Sure, the desire and emotional connection may be there, but the physical side can sometimes be less glamorous and take time. Even more so if there hasn’t been a gradual process of experimentation leading up to the big moment (something YA lit often leaves out for fear of too much sexual content).  

Everything hurts, every single thing including the weight of him and I’m crying because it hurts and he’s telling me he’s sorry over and over again, and I figure that somewhere down the track we’ll work out the right way of doing this but I don’t want to let go, because tonight I’m not looking for anything but being part of him. Because being part of him isn’t just anything. It’s kind of everything.

‘On the Jellicoe Road’ – Melina Marchetta

Consistently depicting sex as the ideal scenario often sets young readers up for unrealised expectations and unnecessary fears. While I’m sure there are some teens who do have amazingly perfect sex, it’s important to show all different types of experiences. Authors shouldn’t be afraid to have characters who are unsure about what they’re doing or miss the mark at first. It’s the human elements that make it memorable and real.

Consent & Protection

When it comes to sex, these are two extremely important topics. And yet, for some reason they’re frequently skimmed over in books because they “ruin the mood”. Sex education is terribly lacking in a lot of places. It isn’t fiction’s job to educate teens but it’s something many turn to for guidance and also a safe space for them to pick up new information. As an author, if you’re going to include sexual content in a book targeted at the most impressionable and curious age group for it, you need to do it right. Furyborn by Clare Le Grand features more explicit sexual content than what’s probably suitable in YA, but it does include a sex scene with clearly established consent and contraception. And did those things kill the mood? Not at all. In fact, I would argue it made the interaction even hotter.

Sexy Francia Raisa GIF by grown-ish

Despite the apparent simplicity of consent (to me, at least), a lot of people still fail to grasp the concept. In my own country Australia, it’s been estimated that 1 in 6 women and 1 in 25 men have experienced at least 1 sexual assault since the age of 15. For this reason, it’s so important that YA books featuring sexual content touch on consent, even if only in passing. Nowadays there’s an increasing number of great YA novels being published which deal with sexual assault and lack of consent (e.g. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson, The Nowhere Girls by Amy Reed, Girl Made of Stars by Ashley Herring Blake, Asking for It by Louise O’Neill, etc.) Having stories which cover issues such as revoked consent, the inability to consent, or sexual coercion are valuable in helping readers of YA lit understand what healthy, respectful and safe sexual relationships look like.

However, while I appreciate increased discussions around absent consent, I do wish more YA books featured affirmative consent or respect of an unwillingness/inability to give consent. A sweet example, albeit just regarding kissing, can be found in Francesca Zappia’s Eliza and her Monsters. Eliza’s love interest Wallace writes her a note asking if he can kiss her. Eliza wants to kiss Wallace but the idea of it right then makes her anxious, so she writes back:

Yes, but not right now.

I know it sounds weird. Sorry, I don’t think it’ll go well if I know it’s coming. I will definitely freak out and punch you in the face or scream bloody murder or something like that.

Surprising me with it would probably work better. I am giving you permission to surprise me with a kiss. This is a formal invitation for surprise kisses.

See? Consent can be sexy and adorable.

Contraception, on the other hand, is something I find authors frequently fail to mention (especially in YA fantasy). Worse, when it is discussed it’s largely because the lack of it has resulted in unwanted pregnancy.

Larry Wilmore Television GIF

The most annoying part is that it’s something which can be covered so easily in just two sentences of dialogue or a thought by the POV character. YA contemporaries have a bunch of options to choose from but even in fantasy it’s not difficult to introduce a tea, powder, or the like for that purpose. In Kristin Cashore’s Graceling series characters take a herb called Seabane while in Tamora Pierce’s Tortall universe women wear healer made pregnancy charms. Aside from reinforcing the idea that protection is an integral component of having sex, the inclusion of contraceptives also has the benefit of advocating the sexual agency and empowerment of female characters, a fantastic thing to impart on readers.

Hitting the Emotions Hard

Sexual representation includes a significant emotional and mental dimension. As I mentioned in part one, sex in YA novels shouldn’t be gratuitous and needs to serve plot and character development. Consequently, the emotional representation is arguably more important than the physical. The decision to have sex can be a big deal for teens and there are a wide range of motivations for doing so including fun/experimentation, romantic connection, peer pressure, or distraction from emotional issues. These provide a multitude of avenues for character exploration in YA books. Alongside these are an array of fears, excitements, insecurities, and expectations, e.g. body self-consciousness, worry about sexual performance, doubts about readiness, newfound closeness to a partner, etc. It’s important that YA authors deal with these types of issues in the prelude and aftermath of sexual interactions to provide for more realistic and relatable depictions.

A Bit of Self Love

Masturbation is a normal part of sexual experience. During teen years, when everything is new and different, it’s a great way for young people to learn about their bodies and work out what they enjoy. Having this awareness can be super empowering and allows for more satisfying sexual encounters later in life. Researchers have found that by the age of 14 more than 60% of boys and 43% of girls have engaged in self-love, and it only increases as they get older. So, if we’re talking about representing sex in YA fiction, masturbation is probably something we should be seeing more of. By shying away from it, we’re losing a key component of characters’ sexual journeys and encouraging the idea of it as something taboo or dirty.

Masturbating Sex And The City GIF

Just like with other sex scenes, it’s not difficult to depict masturbation in YA books without heavy graphic detail. A good example of this is by Becky Albertalli in Simon v the Homo Sapiens Agenda in which the MC, Simon, fantasises about his mysterious pen pal, Blue:

I picture it. He kisses me…There’s this electric tingly feeling radiating through my whole body and my brain has gone fuzzy and I actually think I can hear my heartbeat.

I have to be so, so quiet. Nora’s on the other side of the wall.

His tongue is in my mouth. His hands slide up under my shirt, and he trails his fingers across my chest. I’m so close. It’s almost unbearable. God. Blue.

My whole body turns to jelly.          

Again, it’s important that these scenes are contextualised within the broader novel. Is it helping us to understand the depth of one character’s attraction to another? Is a character trying to get a sense of their body before taking things further with a partner (e.g. Anatomy of a Boyfriend by Daria Snadowsky) or perhaps it’s a coming of age moment? It would be great to see more positive depictions of this in YA stories, especially for girls as their sexual gratification and language surrounding their anatomy is absent far more often than boys.


The representation of sex in YA books is a complex and diverse topic, and I could easily talk about it for far longer than this. There are so many other elements beyond what I’ve mentioned here – communication between characters about sexual experience, how characters of different sexualities play into representation, virgin/slut shaming, just to name a few!

As I’ve mentioned before, I’m not advocating for all YA books to throw in sexual content. There is always a time and a place for it. But just as we need books under this classification which don’t have any sexual content at all, it’s also important that readers have the option to read books which do. Of those, it’s equally key that authors ensure sex is being represented in a meaningful, relatable and realistic way. Based on some of the issues I’ve talked about, there are still a few things young adult books could change or include to better achieve this.  

What are your thoughts on the representation of sex in young adult books? It’s completely fine if you disagree with me entirely!

Have you read any YA books with good sexual representation?


Just in case you were interested in reading more on this topic, here are a few of the materials which assisted me with this post:

Let’s Talk: How Reliable Are My Past Book Reviews and Ratings?

This post is going to be several hundred words of me trashing myself. Just thought I would let you know in advance. Probably not the best decision for a book blogger, the whole basis of her blog being that people actually trust her reviews and ratings, but eh, let’s just go with it.

Book reviews and ratings are extremely subjective. What one person loves and gives five stars to, another person might hate entirely or not even bother to finish. Then there’s the fact that everyone has their own rating systems and ideas about what a specific star level means. It’s chaos, chaos I tell you! But what about the subjectivity between the reviews and ratings of an individual reviewer? If I look back at my reading, reviews and ratings of the last few years there’s definitely some major changes evident in the types of books I read, ways I review and things I consider in deciding my opinion of something. As you might expect, this makes me question the reliability of my past ratings and reviews.

Scaredy Pants Reviewer

I’ve mentioned in the past that, until recently, the idea of using low and really high star ratings was something that made me extremely nervous. Lord knows why. Where my silly brain was concerned, five stars was the god-tier reserved exclusively for Harry Potter and a one star rating was pretty much non-existent. Anything I loved was 4 stars, ‘okay’ or somewhat flawed reads got 3 stars, and to get 2 stars, heaven forbid, you really had to grind my gears. As I’m sure you’ve noticed, this isn’t something I worry about too much anymore. If I really love something, it’s five stars. If it sucks or it’s not for me, 1 and 2 star ratings exist for a reason. However, looking back at the large number of 3 star and 4 star books that make up the bulk of my Goodreads ‘read’ shelf, I can’t help but wonder where things would sit if I had rated them with my current attitude and closer to how I really felt.

Change in Interests, Tastes & Reading Experience

The things we enjoy and the reasons we enjoy them change substantially over the course of our lives. Music I had on loop as a teen, in most cases, isn’t my go to in my mid-twenties (except maybe Taylor Swift & The High School Musical Soundtrack – those will always bop). The same thing applies to books. Over the years, as I’ve read more books from different genres and authors I’ve been exposed to a range of tropes, clichés, character & story archetypes, and writing styles. As a result, things that I once thought were original, exciting or humorous are now…less so. With this experience, my tastes and interests have also gradually shifted toward other things. For these reasons, I’m almost positive that were I to read certain books from years ago now, I’d feel very differently about them. But does that make my reviews and ratings of them less reliable?

This is a bit of a tough call. Although older and more widely read Ashley has better taste and awareness (I hope), my younger self was: (a) experiencing those books for the first time, (b) for YA reads, closer in age to the intended target audience and better able to relate to the characters’ emotions and experiences, and (c) perhaps reading about certain tropes, stories & character types before they became overused. Would I still love Harry Potter as much had I read it for the first time in my twenties? Maybe, maybe not. I hope so, at least, but I guess I’ll never know.

However, with this in mind, I will say that I often have to resist the urge to go back and edit my old reviews (they’re tragic, really) and ratings to make them more in line with my current ideas. It’s extremely tempting, but something I know I need to avoid to prevent further damaging their reliability.

Memory Based Ratings

Now for another tricky one. Review websites have only existed for a certain number of years and it’s fair to say that most people will have read a lot of books before ever deciding to start formally rating, reviewing and discussing them online. By the time we begin to do so, there’s a degree of separation between now and when we actually read those books, leaving us to rely largely on our memory of the content and how we felt about it.

I don’t know about you, but I often forget whether I remembered to unplug my straightener and pack my charger of a morning. So the very suggestion that I’m also able to remember how much I liked a book I read five plus years ago well enough to accurately rate and discuss it seems like a pigs flying kind of scenario. Do I have a general idea? Sure, but is it detailed enough to consider my casual clicking of the Goodreads star buttons for books I read pre-the site entirely reliable ratings? Eh, probably not.

Don’t get me wrong, for books I obsessively loved or hated, this is probably less of a problem as the emotions associated with them are particularly strong, but with the ones in the middle, perhaps take them with a grain of salt.


So, how reliable are my past reviews and ratings? I suppose the answer is: it’s complicated. It all depends on the book, really – when I read it, what I rated it, how memorable it was, and so on and so forth. If that sounds messy to you, you’d be right! Then again, the fact that there are variations in the accuracy and quality of the reviews of an individual reviewer is no different than the mixed bag we usually sift through from multiple reviewers in deciding whether to read a book or not. I suppose it all comes down to finding reviewers who share your interests, tastes and views. When they recommend something, sometimes they’re on the money and other times they’re not. How reliable I am is up to you.

(But as a suggestion, maybe, just maybe check the year on individual reviews & ratings, and hold tasteless, illegible, teen Ashley to a lower standard. Please and thank you!)

Let’s Talk: Book Marketing Trends, Good and Bad

If you’re an avid reader, then you’re likely very familiar with many of the common trends utilised by publishers to market books these days. Where some methods seem to be effective from a sales perspective whilst also being enjoyable and useful from a reader’s standpoint, there are certain others that lean towards being deceptive or just plain annoying. After seeing a post by Michelle on Chelle’s Book Ramblings regarding how book marketing affects our reviewing, I thought it might be fun to look at the good and the bad of current book marketing methods. Let’s get stuck in.

For Fans Of

I’m almost positive that you’ve come across this method at one point or another because I know I have about, oh, a hundred times. You know the one, where a cover name drops one or two big name books, series or authors, claiming that if you’re a fan of them, you’ll definitely love this book. In all fairness, this trend has the potential to go either way depending on the book it’s being used to promote. Sometimes this can be helpful in finding something to read based on things you already like but my biggest problem is that the same books and authors are used over and over again just because they’re popular. This is the case even when the only commonality is genre. It’s a bit like a C-list reality celeb trying to name drop an Oscar winner at an actors party. Awkward. It’s also extremely deceptive to go into something marketed as being something it’s not. Hello, crushing disappointment and frustration. Sorry publishers, but as much as you’d like me to believe it, not every book in the YA fantasy genre is for fans of Leigh Bardugo or Sarah J. Maas.

Doppelgänger Titles

Is it just me or are book titles starting to look more and more like a game of fill in the blanks (E.g. [Something] of [Something] and [Something]) or as though publishers are only allowed to use words from a select list of specific terms (e.g. Shadow, Queen, Thorns, Daughter, Blood, Night, Ash, etc.)?Paperfury actually wrote an entire post about title based trends such as these if you’re interested. While I get that publishers are trying to stick with what they believe works in and appeals to the market, at the same time, I’m getting majorly confused here. I go looking for House of Salt and Sorrows and end up at Master of Sorrows instead, or how about Daughter of Smoke and Bone, and Leigh Bardugo’s Shadow and Bone, and don’t even get me started on just how many ‘City of….’ based titles there are. Help a book loving girl out here! Try something a bit more memorable and original.

Sending ARCs to the Online Book Community

Photo: @readbydev

This is a marketing strategy that’s become very popular nowadays. From a reader’s perspective, it’s a great. Well, aside from making the wait for anticipated releases even more agonising. I love being able to read advanced reviews from people with similar attitudes to my own. It means I know what to expect going into something and whether or not it’ll be something I enjoy. With so much to read, I ain’t got time for disappointment.

For publishers, this strategy can fuel sales but also risks damaging them. In sending ARCs out, they almost guarantee that a book will consistently be on readers’ radars leading up to release day, fanning the hype flames. Even those who don’t ordinarily gravitate toward that type of read may buy it simply because they can’t get it out of their head. Add in a string of positive early reviews, and you’re pretty much set for success. However, there’s always the chance that early reactions to a book will be negative and widespread, severely damaging efforts for a strong release.

Embracing Cover Trends

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Every genre has its own set of cover trends. Modern romance? Cute, graphic designed people. Crime? Photographs of ominous buildings or female faces. Contemporary fiction? Large, funky looking title text. You get the picture. They’re all targeted to appeal to the audience that reads those books. By adhering to cover trends, publishers are able to package a book in a way that’s familiar to genre readers (especially with debuts), encouraging them to draw similarities between it and others in the genre they’ve liked. The problem is though, sometimes this can end up being misleading when it comes to content.

Just because a book falls under a specific genre doesn’t mean it also sits within the same subgenre as books which have previously embraced that cover trend. One example Michelle raised in her post was Meet Cute by Helena Hunting. This is a romance book whose cover makes it look purely like a fluffy, cutesy romance. In reality, it’s a lot more serious in that it revolves largely around a a custody case and involves multiple personal tragedies. While a book may still be enjoyable despite not being what you expected, it’s hard not to feel a little deceived and betrayed by a misleading cover.

Pre-Order Bonuses

This has to be one of the smartest book marketing strategies on this list. Why? Because there’s basically no downside to it for publishers (except perhaps printing costs or the like) AND readers (ecstatic because they’ve gotten something for nothing). Pre-order numbers are extremely important for authors, especially newish authors. So offering readers an incentive to pre-order is a great way of getting early purchase numbers up for a book, which can potentially impact the size of the print run. All the publisher has to do is throw in a free print or perhaps a chance at winning a signed copy and they’re golden. As a reader, all your doing is paying what you would have had you purchased the book post-release, so it’s pretty much a ‘why not?’ scenario. Win-win.

Author Tours/Signings

Author signings are another marketing strategy which usually work well for both readers and publishers. If there’s something bookworms love, it’s getting to meet the writers of their favourite reads and bombarding them with questions. Signings increase the hype for a release and encourage readers to buy the book purely so they can get a personalised signed copy. I will say, though, this does work better promotion wise when you have a charismatic, interesting or funny author. I’ve been to signings where people are there purely because of friends, having never read one of the author’s books, but come away buying a copy because they enjoyed an author’s personality and Q&A so much. Still, these tours seem to be the done thing for authors these days regardless.


It’s clear that book marketing methods aren’t always the best for readers and publishers simultaneously. And while these strategies may be all the rage now, it’s reasonable to expect that new approaches will develop in the near future. After all, if it works, it works, right?

Which book marketing strategies do you most appreciate from a reader’s POV? Which ones drive you mad with frustration?

Let’s Talk: Things I Wish Were Found in YA Lit More

As much as I enjoy young adult books, there will always be things that aren’t featured, included or found as often as I would like them to be. But as they say, you’ll never get what you want unless you ask for it. So here are 8 things I’d love to see more of in YA in the future:

Characters & Families from Different Cultural Backgrounds

I’m definitely not alone on this one. As a white, Australian woman from a middle class family (we’re extremely boring), I absolutely love reading YA books featuring families and characters with different cultures, customs, and ideas. It’s such a personal way of learning about how other people experience the world as well as the things that bring them joy and the difficulties they experience. This is massively important from a representation standpoint but in terms of narrative, boy does reading about the same types of characters get extremely repetitive and tedious.

Sex

This is a slightly controversial one. In fact, I wrote an entire discussion post about it. Despite what some people claim, sex is an important part of the lives of a lot of young people. It can be difficult in some settings for them to get information about it or to find realistic depictions of the circumstances surrounding it – consent, protection, health, communication, preparation, etc. Especially since many of the books that do deal with it commonly find themselves banned. I’m not looking for super explicit sex scenes, those don’t belong in YA in my opinion, but I would love to see characters talking about it in a healthy and realistic way, and, even better, without shaming one another for it.

Friends Growing Apart

I’m used to finding two types of friendships in YA: 1) the ride or die friends that give us major friendship envy, and 2) the characters who were childhood friends before one became a massive jerk. As anyone who’s ever, well, lived knows, sometimes friends just simply grow apart. It’s not because someone did something wrong but simply because at one point your paths diverged. Maybe it’s a new school, a change in interests, or an increasingly busy schedule? One minute you’re speaking to each other every day and the next you can’t remember the last time you saw them. It can be a hard thing to accept, especially during teen and early university years, and I really wish it was something featured more in YA as a part of growing up.

(Speaking of Friends) More Great Friendships

YA stories have a tendency to focus a lot on romantic relationships and while I love a good romance, I have a special place in my heart for fabulous friendships. New ones, old ones, all ones. Give me some more platonic, and well developed, relationships in my YA.

Academic Pressure & Other Future Pathways

The pressure of academic success is familiar to a lot of YA readers. With the expectations of family, teachers, and academic institutions on top of you, it’s very easy to feel suffocated and burnt out. Over an extended period, it can have a profound impact on mental & physical health, and socialisation. This pressure is also connected with people’s hopes for the future, specifically university. Many students see university as their only choice and some are so focused on getting into a specific course or school simply because it’s what’s expected of them or they feel they should do, they don’t stop and think about what they want. The minute something disrupts the plan, they feel their life is over. I would love to see more characters dealing with these obstacles and books showcasing other pathways as options.

Smart AND Strong Heroines

I adore books which feature kick-ass female characters (provided they also have a personality). There’s something warm and fuzzy about seeing a heroine defeat someone with their epic magic or superior sword fighting skills. Yet, what I wish I saw more of is women with the ability to take people down with their mind. I want to see ambitious women, women able to outsmart those around them, women who understand people, and more importantly, women who know how to get things done when a physical assault just won’t do.

Non US & English Settings

Let’s be honest, the majority of big name YA books, if they’re not in fantasy/dystopian worlds, are set in either the United States or England. There’s nothing wrong with these locations but they’re just two of many, many countries in the world. It would be great to read some stories set in other places. Think of the untapped potential! If you can’t physically travel, at least you should be able to do it through books, right?

More Bisexual & Asexual Characters

The fact that gay and lesbian characters are starting to become more and more common in books is something that makes me immensely happy. However, I often feel as though bisexual and asexual characters have been left behind somewhat. These two sexual orientations often face a lot of misunderstanding and judgment, and I’d love for them to get their time in the spotlight.


And that concludes my YA lit wish list! What things do you wish were more commonly found in YA books or, if you’re not a big YA reader, just books in general? Characters, themes, plotlines, it’s all fair game!

Let’s Talk: My 2019 Book Burnout and How I Finally Sent it Packing

2019 has been an interesting year for me. I wish I could say it’s because I read more amazing books than any year before but, in reality, it’s because for a large chunk of it I was in the midst of a book burnout. Before this year, while I was very used to seeing the phrase ‘reading slump’ pop up around the web, I had yet to experience one for myself. Goodreads always seemed to be full of status updates of people lamenting how badly they wanted to read things and feeling unable to do so, and on WordPress I’d see blog posts labelled things like, ‘Tips for Surviving the Book Slump’, or ’10 Books to Beat Your Reading Slump’. At the time, I sat there going: That sounds like it sucks. I’m lucky that never happens to me!

And…here we are.

Now, Ashley, I hear you saying, that’s all good and well, but why are you calling this a ‘burnout’? How’s it any different from your average, run of the mill slump? That’s a great question and I’m glad you asked. When I say, ‘book burnout’ I’m not just talking about, oh, I had trouble reading a few books. I’m talking about slumpageddon! (Yes, I realise I’m being a bit dramatic. Just let me live). I’m talking:

  • Having trouble engaging with/enjoying books & reading them at snails pace
  • Being disinterested in buying books and unable to make it past the first two sentences of a blurb because IT ALL JUST SOUNDS THE SAME
  • Getting behind on my yearly reading goal and then having an existential crisis about the purpose of said goal
  • Feeling overwhelmed by the number of must read, new releases coming out that I need to cover in order to keep up with the book community
  • Being unable to muster excitement for many of these releases at all
  • Then remembering the number of popular books already released that I have yet to read and feeling crushed by that, too.
  • Taking multiple month-long breaks from blogging and bookstagram because the creative spark has disappeared. GONE. POOF.
  • Questioning the quality of the content on my blog and bookstagram and wondering whether it’s even worth continuing.

Do you see why book slump just doesn’t cut it?

Having reached December, I can safely say that I’m now in a much better place about all these things than I was six months ago. As you can see, I’ve returned to blogging, I’m posting the occasional bookstagram photo, enjoying reading again, and eagerly looking out for new exciting books to add to my TBR. I’ve even submitted in a few ARC requests. And now, you know what that means…it’s time for my very own version of the ‘how to beat the slump’ post! Here they are, my top tips on how to kick a book burnout (or slump) to the curb:

Try Something New

As it turns out, it’s very easy to get bored with books when you’re reading and writing about the same things over and over. Seems like an obvious one, I know. And it has an equally obvious solution: try books from different genres. While I love a good YA fantasy, after a while you do start to see recurring tropes, stories and characters. This is why it’s important to shake things up once in a while. Lately, I’ve tackled sci-fi, romantic contemporaries, thrillers, even some non-fiction(!), and not only have I enjoyed it, I’ve bought more. Better yet, for the first time in a while I’m genuinely excited to sit down and read both my usual genres and others.

Focus Your Excitement

With Goodreads on hand it’s very easy to get carried away adding upcoming releases to the to-read shelf, especially when the latest ‘it’ book seems to be showing up everywhere. The reality is, there’s only a short list of books that I’m genuinely super excited, race out to the shops on release week, for. To counteract my feeling of being overwhelmed it was important for me to work out what those books were. A few months ago, I did a Top Ten Tuesday post about my anticipated releases for the rest of 2019. While I could have padded out the list to reach the full 10, I instead ended up with only six and instantly felt better about (and even excited for) the next few months looking at it.

A Creative Break

There can be a lot of self-imposed pressure as a blogger/bookstagrammer. In a sea of talented creators, it’s easy to feel lost and get down on yourself. Trying to come up with content that stands out and still post regularly can be a challenge. This year I took some time off to recharge and when I was ready, I decided to spend some time writing and taking photos without posting. As someone who doesn’t usually have their posts prepared very far in advance, creating without posting was extremely liberating. Not only was I able to look at my work in isolation and feel confident about it, but I built up a decent library of posts, organised a schedule for posting them, and spent as much time editing and playing around as I liked. No pressure! I wrote more reviews, had fun, and remembered why I spend my time doing this. 

Lower Your Expectations

This was the simplest thing I did and it’s ridiculous that it took me so long. Reading goal stressing you out? Just lower it! That’s all! There’s no rule that says you cannot adjust your yearly reading goal as you go. When I first set my 2019 goal, it was based on my 2018 result, but lives and schedules change. In 2018 I was spending extra time on public transport and whizzing through shorter books. While The Selection and The Name of the Wind both count as one book, the time and energy which goes into reading them is vastly different. Sure, there may be readers out there easily able to read over 100 books a year but there’s no point stressing yourself out trying to keep up with them.

It’s OK to Netflix (And Other Things)

Another obvious one. Reading is a hobby. It’s supposed to be fun. If you don’t feel like reading, then don’t. Simple as that. There’s nothing wrong with wanting to go do something else whether it be baking, exercise, spending time with a friend, or browsing YouTube. Nowadays, if on the commute to work I feel like watching the show I’m currently bingeing instead of reading, then that’s what I do! You do you.

Re-reading Faves

One of the problems I had during my burnout was a tendency to pick up books and within only a couple of seconds dismiss them as something I wouldn’t enjoy. A way of getting around this was to read something I already knew I loved and use the momentum from that book to read something new. This tactic didn’t always go as planned (I was still slow on my re-reads) but it was certainly an improvement.

Read Something Short, Light and Fun

After getting bogged down by more serious books, I found that reading a bunch of fun and easy-breezy romantic contemporaries in a row was a breath of fresh air. It also gave me some great reading momentum. Sometimes being able to switch your brain off for a while is a good way to jump start it. So, go out there, find your book version of a trashy reality TV show, and have some fun!


While book burnouts (or reading slumps) aren’t exactly fun, they do pass. Eventually. At the very least, I believe I’ve learned a few things from the experience that will hopefully prevent it from happening to me again. Or, well, at least not as hard.

Have you ever experienced a book burnout or reading slump? And if so, how did you get out of it?

Let’s Talk: The Challenges of Reviewing Diverse YA Books

When I first considered discussing this topic, I wondered whether it would be possible to do so, as a white, straight, cis, able, and mentally healthy woman, without sounding like an insensitive and privileged ass. Then again, the point of book blogging is to discuss opinions on book related topics and if we’re afraid to do that, then why blog in the first place? So, I’m going to give it my best shot. Diversity in YA books and how to appropriately review diverse reads is something I’ve thought about a great deal over the past year or so. While there is still a very long way to go, I honestly believe that in recent years there have been great strides made with regards to putting different ethnicities, cultures, sexualities, mental health conditions, and disabilities at the forefront of YA stories and representing them well. Yet, this progress also presents certain difficulties with regards to reviewing.

When an author takes the time to properly showcase the stories of people in a minority or stigmatised group or, better yet, writes an ‘own voices’ novel representing elements of their own experiences, it’s a pretty amazing thing. These kinds of stories deserve to be told and should be encouraged.

But.

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What happens when a novel wonderfully incorporates diversity, but fails to appeal in terms of plot, characters, setting or writing style? These books pose a significant challenge to reviewers. Critique the book heavily and you risk damaging public opinion/book sales, meaning a publisher may pull back on releasing these kinds of stories in the future. Downplay your doubts to focus on praising the book simply for being diverse, and suddenly you’re not being honest. I’ve found myself in this position numerous times since I began blogging and bookstagramming. I want to be able to read books about, and written by, people with different experiences, characteristics, and obstacles. Without them, fiction would be extremely boring. At the same time, I don’t want to boost an author’s work purely because it’s diverse.

In the past, my approach towards reviewing diverse reads has generally been, where possible, to treat the diversity elements and the quality of that representation separately from other major areas e.g. enjoyment of plot, development of characters, etc. Where the book succeeds on all fronts, reviewing is easy. Problems arise where the diverse components are good, but the book fails to satisfy on the other big elements. Having organic, realistic, and well-handled representation is considered a major positive in deciding my overall rating of a book, but at the same time, it’s only one part of the overall picture. Consequently, even wonderfully diverse reads can still end up with an average or not so great final rating.

Looking at book reviews on star ratings alone, this approach could be considered extremely damaging to efforts to expand YA diversity. For this reason, I believe it is extremely important that, as reviewers, we consistently make an effort to discuss diversity/representation in our reviews (where relevant), and to praise elements of good representation even if the review itself is largely negative. In doing so though, we do have to trust that readers will take the time to look at our reviews beyond just the hard number score. At least this way we ensure we remain honest yet still show support for a growing and diversified YA genre.

A few examples of books which have created this challenge for me over the last few years include:

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  • Children of Blood and Bone – Tomi Adeymi: How often do we see West-African inspired YA fantasy books? Not very often, and aside from some confusion over the magic system, I loved the setting/world building in this book. My final rating was a solid 3.5 stars – not bad, but not the glowing highs of the hype train. In the end, this was due to my issues with irrational character behaviour, stretches of boring plot, and unnecessary/forced romance.
  • Girls of Paper and Fire – Natasha Ngan: GoP&F is a YA fantasy set in a Malaysian inspired world. It features Asian leads and involves a lesbian romance. On that basis alone it ticks great diversity boxes, and yet, my final rating was 2.5 stars. I liked the premise of this book and so badly wanted to rejoice in something that put strong, Asian, lesbian women at the centre of a story. However, from an enjoyment perspective, I couldn’t get past my issues with the worldbuilding, pacing, and inability to connect with the characters.
  • Queens of Geek – Jen Wilde: QoG is a sweet and fluffy YA contemporary. It features a bisexual lead, a plus-sized lead with Asperger’s and anxiety, and a bunch of side characters who are racially diverse and suffer from disabilities. This is a book that screams diversity. Yet, there’s also minimal plot and very simplistic writing, which rendered it only a 3-star read for me.
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Being unable to give these kinds of books glowing reviews is extremely difficult because I genuinely want authors and stories like these to succeed. In many cases, this pressure has even discouraged me from wanting to write a review altogether, especially where the diverse elements are inextricably linked to the major components of the story e.g. American Panda by Gloria Chao. Stories like these make me wonder whether, as someone who does not write reviews for every book they read, I should perhaps direct my attention to reviewing only those diverse reads that I genuinely really enjoy. Then again, an approach like this seems to involve its own problems and depending on what I choose to read could result in reviews of little to no diverse books on my blog.

On the flip side of this is the equally challenging situation of how to a review a book which does well on the enjoyment scale yet fails when it comes to realistic and good quality representation. Are we allowed to like and praise a book even though it handles the treatment of certain groups and experiences badly? While I may have said that good representation is not the ultimate determiner of a review rating, for most reviewers the reverse does not seem to hold true. Fail in your attempts at good representation and half the book reviewing community will roast you alive while the other half grab marshmallows. It’s situations like this in which I’m likely to avoid writing a review and to spend agonising time selecting a star rating on Goodreads. However, in saying this, my biggest worry is not that I’ll like a book that does certain groups a disservice, but that I’ll review it positively without even knowing or picking up on just how bad the representation is.

Despite my ability to sympathise with fictional characters, I do not have detailed knowledge of what life is like for every group out there. I have never experienced depression, I am not from an immigrant family, no one I know has experienced police profiling or brutality, and I have never had to deal with sexuality-based stigma. There are a multitude of things that I have no way of knowing anything about until I (a) meet someone who has first-hand knowledge of these things or (b) I read about them. Being able to pick out the realistic from the skewed is a challenge with diverse reads and makes it difficult as a reviewer to ensure we’re writing an informed review. This then begs the question, am I even qualified to write these kinds of reviews?

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Earlier this week I finished reading All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven. This is a book that deals with suicide, depression, PTSD, survivor’s guilt, bipolar disorder, and bullying. At several points during the novel I found myself questioning the realism of how some of these issues were represented. And as usual, when in doubt, I went to Goodreads. Scrolling through the book’s page, I found that there are some people who relate heavily to MC Finch and his experiences with mental health while others who have also experienced depression and attempted suicide take great issue with how these are depicted. This leaves me with more questions than ever – if even those with first-hand experience cannot decide if the representation is good or bad, how in the world am I to know? The only solution I can see to this is to do my own research and determine whether what I’ve read represents the experiences and reality for at least a small component of the chosen represented group, even if it may not represent the majority.

At this point, I’m not entirely sure what the correct way forward is. Perhaps it’s more of a case by case type of issue. In the end, I suppose all we can do is review the books in front of us as honestly and constructively as we can with a sense of self-awareness. We also need to continue to demand better representation of minorities in the things we read and hope that writers continue to put these stories out there and that publishers will help them reach us.

Let’s Talk: What are your thoughts on the difficulties associated with reviewing diverse books? Do you have any similar experiences and if so, how do you deal with them?

Let’s Talk: Bookish Pet-Peeves

For something a little fun, or stressful depending on how you look at it, today I’m looking at things related to books that drive me nuts. Things that make me want to scream in frustration or just sit down and cry. All the normal stuff and…the somewhat er, crazy stuff. This post will be focusing on external things rather internal things like characters, plot, etc. Warning, this post will be full of rage, caps, sound effects and, just because I can, Gilmore Girls Gifs.

Different Book Sizes or Cover Designs in a Series

Now, I know I’m not alone on this one. I’m one of those people that likes to shelve books from the same author and series next to each other. I also happen to like my bookshelves to be visually pleasing and usually that means separating things out based on size too, if I can. But HOW am I supposed to do THAT when publishers decide mid series to randomly change the size or design of the next book from what’s come before? Gosh, I can’t even describe the nightmare that is my copies of The Ember Quartet – one big, one small and then one with a completely new cover design. Please, for all the bookcase neat freaks out there, do us this service and just keep the damn thing consistent. I’m legit afraid by the time I start reading The Dark Artifices that copies of Lord of Shadows in matching height to my Lady Midnight will have disappeared off the face of the Earth. The struggle is real.

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Borrowers Who Don’t Return Books For Ages

Why you gotta do this to a girl? I have lovingly given you the fruit of my bookcase, my baby (let’s face it, they’re all my babies) and this is how you repay me? Also, let me just say, it’s guaranteed that the minute you borrow that book and start reading it, I’ll remember how awesome it is and want to do a reread. But oh wait, I CAN’T. The whole point of this lending thing is that we can talk about it after you read it. So, hurry up!

Cracked Spines

I think a little bit of my soul shrivels up and dies each time I feel a beautiful spine crack down the middle as I’m reading. Or even worse, when it cracks multiple times. *cries*. I don’t know what it is, some spines are built to last being run over by a truck while others fail at the slightest pull back of the cover (I barely touched it, I swear!). It just looks so awful and worse still, that’s the part which faces out of the bookcase for everyone to see. Argggggg.

Cant Look Season 3 GIF by Gilmore Girls

Folded Corners, Not Bookmarks

Need I say more? There’s a special place for people who fold down book pages to mark their spot. If you’re one of these people, STOP. Every time you fold a page, a cuddly animal dies. I swear. You’re also breaking my heart. Bookmarks are gloriously pretty. Buy one. Pleaseeeeeeee.

Stickers That Leave Residue

I feel the rage building. God I hate it when I buy a book and the store has stuck a big price or promotional sticker across the cover which is virtually impossible to get off cleanly. I’m still working on finding the perfect way to get rid of the icky residue that never seems to budge no matter how hard you scratch or rub. My poor copy of Fangirl has suffered many attempts to no end.

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Printed Stickers

What’s worse than stickers that don’t remove cleanly? Stickers that don’t remove at all! There’s nothing like that moment when you go to remove a sticker only to realise, NO, it’s been printed on the cover. Like, why for the love of all that’s good and holy do publishers do this? Did I really need a permanent sticker to tell me that To Kill a Kingdom would be great if I love Leigh Bardugo or Sarah J Maas. Hell No. Did I need a printed sticker to tell me that Slayer is set in the world of Buffy the Vampire Slayer when it’s already in text on the cover? OF COURSE NOT. *shrieks unintelligibly*

Delayed Release Dates

Okay, the logical part of my brain knows there’s usually a good reason for this but the crazy fan part of my brain doesn’t listen to that part when this happens. Picture this, you’ve been desperately waiting ages for an author to release the next book in one of your absolute favourite series. There’s only a few more months to go, you’ve almost made it, the end is in sight…until, the announcement. It’s been postponed and not just a couple of weeks. Cue massive tantrum and depressive spiral. The things we booklovers suffer through…

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Interruptions During Great/Long Awaited Book Scenes

Okay, look, I love you and all, but can you not see that I am reading and do not want to have a conversation right now? *person starts talking* Well…clearly not. There are few bookish pains worse than getting to a moment in your novel you’ve been really looking forward to or where things are happening big time only for someone to come along and interrupt you. Way to break the flow, buddy. Back away slowly before I attack you.

Movie Poster Cover Take Overs

Have you ever noticed that right around the time an adaptation comes out, suddenly the only covers you can find for a book in store are the poster versions? What if I don’t want your movie cover cover? HUH?! What if the adaptation is garbage and I’m stuck remembering that every time I pick it up? WHAT THEN? Noooooo, thank you. But then again, I think I’m also just one of those weird purists who really wants the book cover for the book. You have no idea how long it took me to see a copy of The Help without the film cover after the adaptation was released, and that’s actually a movie I really love! Life’s hard being a cover snob, I tell ya.

Annoyed Rory Gilmore GIF by Gilmore Girls

Ugly Book Covers

So, you had the chance to do something beautifully eye catching that (a) people would irresistibly pick up at the bookstore, (b) want to take photos of and (c) would not be embarrassed to be seen reading on public transport. Instead…this is what we’ve ended up with. I hate it when great books are stuck with ridiculously ugly covers. Half the time it looks like pure laziness and the other half, I have to sit there and wonder how the hell multiple people at a publisher ever thought that that looked good. Now I’m stuck carting around this atrocity to the eye.

*Takes calming breathes* Okay, I think that’s enough bookish raging for the moment. Any more and I’ll do a Veruca Salt down the bad egg chute. It won’t be pretty.

Let’s Talk! What bookish related things drive you absolutely crazy?

Stabtastic: 7 Assassin Reads for When you Feel Like Something Bloody & Murderous

I love a good stabtastic read on occasion (totally a real, not at all made up word). After all, a little moral ambiguity is good for the household bookworm. Plus, if there’s one thing assassin stories aren’t, it’s boring. Well, at least the majority of the time. But what books are out there to fulfill the occasional need for something a little dark and potentially messy? Here are 7 books that may fit the bill.

Just to state up front, I haven’t read all of these so don’t hate on me if there’s something here that you weren’t so keen on.

Nevernight – Jay Kristoff

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Let’s kick things off with the obvious pick – obvious because I freakin’ love this series. Nevernight is about a girl named Mia whose family is killed by the Emperor when she is ten years old. Six years later she sets out in search of a school for assassins called The Red Church in the hopes of making herself into a weapon strong enough to get revenge. The Red Church is hardcore though and if you can’t hack it as a student, you die. Simple as that. Mia also happens to be special in that she’s a Darkin – someone with the rare ability to control shadows. One of the ways her ability manifests itself is as a shadow companion in the shape of a cat which she calls Mr Kindly. Basically, it’s dark, bloody, sassy, a little smutty, and it’s fabulous.

Shelves: Adult, Revenge-Story, Training-Academy, Magic, Sass, Quotable.

Grave Mercy – Robin Lafevers

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This one is on my neverending TBR. Grave Mercy follows seventeen-year-old Ismae who is supposed to be married off to an older man. When a mark on her back identifying her as one of Death’s Daughters is found, she’s sent off to the convent at St. Mortain. Here, the nuns give her a choice – leave and marry, or stay and train as an assassin to serve as a handmaiden to Death (assassin nun). Following her training, she’s sent to court in Brittany to protect the young Duchess, Anne, from the French. To do this, she poses as mistress to Anne’s illegitimate half-brother, Gavriel Duval, who may or may not be acting against her. What will come as a shock to no one, Gavriel and Isame fall for each other. Like Mia in Nevernight, Isame also has special abilities in that she has an immunity to poisons and can talk to souls. Although the story does revolve around politcial espionage and mystery, it’s in large part a historical romance and does have a slower pace so keep that in mind.

Shelves: YA, Historical-Romance, Assassin-nuns, Alternate-History, Political-Intrigue, Mystery.

Red Sister – Mark Lawrence

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Sorry, did you just say you wanted MORE assassin nuns? Well, I aim to please. Red Sister is another book which utilises the good old training academy trope. It revolves around eight-year-old Nona Grey. Nona is taken in by the nuns of Sweet Mercy Convent after she shows signs of magical abilities derived from ancient bloodlines when she murders the son of a powerful man. The nuns offer her the opportunity to avoid execution by taking up a position as a novice and spending the next ten years training to become a fearsome warrior. RS spans over the first three years of Nona’s training. Much of the book is spent within the confines of the convent but there are also threats to Nona from the outside – the consequences of her actions before becoming a novice. Additionally, the book has a chosen one element and features a largely 90% female cast of badass characters.

Shelves: Chosen One, Magic, Assassin-Nuns, Strong-Female-Characters, Friendship, No-Romance, Training-Academies.

Throne of Glass – Sarah J. Maas

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Come on, I had to do it. It’s not a fave of mine but could you imagine the rioting if I left it off? The Assasin’s Blade would probably be a better pick, but as ToG is the original, we’ll go with it instead. Book one in the series introduces us to Celaena Sardothien, trained assassin, and currently serving a life sentence in the salt mines of Endovier. In exchange for her freedom, Celaena is offered the chance to represent Prince Dorian as a candidate in his father’s to-the-death tournament to find a new royal assassin. Here she’ll be pitted against some of the most gifted thieves and assassins in the land, and either she’ll win or die trying. After books 1, 2 & the prequel, the series does direct focus away from the assassin vibe but Celaena’s history as an assassin and associated skills do play a big role in the other books. It’s high stakes fantasy with battles, faeries, magic and romance. But be prepared, the series is 8 books long so it’s going to take a WHILE.

Shelves: YA, Tournament, Royalty, Lost-Princess, Magic, Kickass-MC, Friendship, Book-Boyfriends.

Assassin’s Apprentice – Robin Hobb

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Robin Hobb is a big name in the fantasy genre and the Farseer trilogy is considered to be one of her best series. In Assassin’s Apprentice, we meet Fitz, the royal bastard. Fitz has difficulty finding his place, something made worse by the fact that he has a magical link with animals known as the Wit – a craft hated by the nobility. Once he gets older, Fitz is adopted into the royal household and begins training to become the royal assassin. The books follow Fitz’s adventures and trials, dealing with politics, war, loss and revenge. This is another series that starts out slow. However, the books were so popular that they spawned two more series about the character.

Shelves: High-Fantasy, Royalty, Magic, Mentor-Apprentice, Coming-of-Age, Politics, Underdog-Protagonist.

Graceling – Kristin Cashore

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Another kick-ass leading lady and another romance style fantasy. Our MC is Katsa – a girl born with a Grace (exceptional skill or talent) for killing people. Because of this, she serves as a thug for the king, her uncle, travelling across the land killing, torturing and instilling nightmares. However, as she grows up Katsa starts to question her role. One day she comes across Po, a graced man as talented in fighting as she is. He turns out to be a Prince who has come searching for his kidnapped grandfather. The two start up a friendship and set out together to track down the kidnappers. As you’d expect, the two also fall in love. The book is a series of three which changes focus characters each time around. It’s won a bunch of awards, has a 4.12 average GR rating, and known to contain one of the most loveable romantic interests around. Although, I should note that the feminism aspect to this novel is very much on the side of: reject all things considered to be feminine and girly.

Shelves: YA, Romance, Friends-to-Lovers, Adventure, Magic, Coming-of-Age, Action, Radical Feminism, Kingdoms-and-Royals

The Way of Shadows – Brent Weeks

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This book is one of those weird ones where the average Goodreads rating is high and the top reviews are negative. Probably because the story itself has some issues but people seem to enjoy it as a sort of guilty pleasure read? The first book in the Night Angel series introduces us to Azoth, a guild rat who lives a miserable existence in the slums. To escape his situation, he apprentices himself to renowned Wetboy (aka super assassin) Durzo Blint. Azoth is forced to leave his old life entirely behind and is given a new name, Kylar Stern. He then begins his training in magic, fighting and poisons to become a Wetboy himself. His skills are soon put to the test when his city is threatened. While the dialogue is supposedly questionable at times, and the attitudes towards women could use a lot of work, The Way of Shadows is supposedly an action packed and fast paced ride. If you enjoy fantasy tropes, this book includes a few of them. The book doesn’t involve much focus on world building, although the magic system is reportedly pretty interesting, and instead directs attention to plot and characters.

Shelves: Adult, Grim-Dark, Action, Magic, Coming-of-Age, Male-Protagonist, Mentor-Apprentice.

Have you read any of these? What did you think?

What’s your favourite assassin themed book?

#LoveOzYa – Giving Some Love to YA Books by Australian Authors

If you haven’t already worked this out from either (a) my ‘About Me’ page or (b) my language choices in most of my posts, I am Australian. A Sydney-sider to be exact. And, of course, as a good Aussie bookworm, most of the novels I read are by…not Australian authors…Awks. So, today I’m going to try and rectify my shortcomings (somewhat) by showing off a few YA books by some of my country’s fabulous authors.

Let me just say, I haven’t read every book on the list so in quite a few cases I’m relying on the positive reviews of others or a really great sounding blurb. I’ve tried to cover some books that not as many people overseas might know about. So as much as I adore Illuminae and The Book Thief, you won’t see them on this list. Off we go!


Tomorrow When the War Began – John Marsden

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TWTWB is just one of those books you pretty much have to read as an Aussie teen but it’s definitely able to be enjoyed by anyone. The story follows a group of friends who go camping only to find out upon their return, that their country has been invaded and their town taken prisoner. The teens then have to decide whether they should hide, surrender or fight. The strength of this novel lies in that each of JM’s characters feels real, distinct and complex. The book also manages to perfectly balance the line between action and heartbreaking emotion. It’s an interesting look at war and a fantastic start to great series.

About the Author:

  • John knew he wanted to be an author at age 9 but it wasn’t until 37 that he finally published his book, So Much to Tell You.
  • He’s sold more than 2 1/2 million books in Australia alone!
  • For 8 years, he ran a super popular writing course just outside of Melbourne
  • In 2006 he started his own school, Candlebark, for preschool to year 7 students. It’s so popular it has a 4-year wait list.

Pieces of Sky – Trinity Doyle

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Lucy’s life with her family in a small coastal town is easy and happy, but this dramatically changes the day her brother, Cam, drowns under mysterious circumstances. Now she can’t bear to go back to her local swimming club, her parents are shells of what they used to be, and Lucy herself is just struggling to keep going. Drawn to Steffi, her wild ex-best-friend who reminds Lucy of her brother, and music-obsessed Evan, the new boy in town, Lucy starts asking questions about Cam’s death – was it an accident or suicide? But as Lucy hunts for answers she discovers much more than she expects. About Cam. About her family. About herself.

Pieces of Sky seems like such an honest and emotional read, and it’s only got just over 700 ratings on GR. Also, that cover is stunning.

About the Author:

  • Trinity has done a wide range of different jobs – music photographer, graphic designer, joint head of a record label, bassist in multiple girl bands, and obviously novelist!
  • Pieces of Sky is Trinity’s first novel and stemmed from her writing emo poetry.
  • Her favourite book growing up is the next book on this list. She’s a big Marchetta fan.
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Looking for Alibrandi – Melina Marchetta

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Remember how I said John Marsden is one of those books you have to read as an Aussie teen? Well, this is the other one. Literally, it gets assigned to pretty much everyone at school. Josephine Alibrandi lives with her Italian mother and grandmother, and it’s been that way for as long as she can remember. It’s her final year at her wealthy Catholic School and all of a sudden – she just can’t seem to avoid men trouble. There’s her father, who’s suddenly come back into her life, Jacob, the hottie from Cooke High who her family would surely disapprove of, and John, Josie’s best friend who seems to have problems of his own. It’s a fairly short read that deals with growing up, identity, depression, first love, and life as an immigrant. It’s kind of an oldie now, but still a goodie.

About the Author:

  • Looking for Alibrandi (1992) was Melina’s debut novel, which she later turned into a film script and it was adapted in 2000.
  • She used to balance teaching & writing before committing to writing full time.
  • Some of her other books include
    On the Jellicoe Road, Saving Francesca and Finnikin of the Rock,
  • Her books have won numerous awards and she’s known as one of the big names in Aussie YA fiction.
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In the Dark Spaces – Cally Black

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This book is on the younger end of the YA range, but as the most recent winner of the Ampersand Prize, it’s definitely worth noticing. For the past year, Tamara has been living as a stowaway on board the deep space freighter, Starweaver Layla. Here she spends her time looking after her baby cousin and quietly sneaking around the ship’s crawl spaces. Her life is soon thrown into chaos when the ship is invaded by a group of aliens – the Crowpeople, whom no ship has survived an attack from. To her shock, Tamara is taken back to the hive as a hostage to be tested. Here she begins to learn about the aliens’ way of life and to integrate herself into their community. This leaves her with a difficult choice – stay, knowing she’ll never see her family again, or risk everything to escape?

About the Author:

  • In the Dark Spaces is Cally Black’s first published novel.
  • She works in education and lives in Melbourne with her family.
  • Cally is fascinated by science and technology but she’s also drawn to stories about those on the outskirts of society.
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Words in Deep Blue – Cath Crowley

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WiDP revolves around Henry & Rachel who were once best friends before Rachel moved away. Upon her return three years later, she gets a job in the bookstore owned by Henry’s family. Whilst trying to process the grief of losing her brother, she finds comfort in the letters and notes left by others inside the books she catalogues. Meanwhile, Henry has his own problems – his girlfriend has broken up with him again and he’s still unsure about his future. Slowly Henry and Rachel begin to rekindle their friendship but it’ll require them to deal with the elephant in the room – that Rachel once confessed she was in love with Henry. The story is told in alternating perspectives and it’s about BOOKS, love, grief, friendship and learning to live again. Prepare thy emotions!

About the Author:

  • Cath first discovered she wanted to be a writer on a trip to Europe during which she sent her brother letters of her adventures (which he used to turn into a musical!).
  • The loss of her father helped her to write Words in Deep Blue and understand just how different grief is for each person.
  • Her most recent novel, Take Three Girls, was published in 2017.
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Jasper Jones – Craig Silvey

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Late on a hot summer night in 1965, thirteen-year-old Charlie Bucktin, is startled by an urgent knock on his window. His visitor is Jasper Jones, Corrigan’s town outcast. Rebellious, mixed-race and solitary, Jasper is a figure of danger and intrigue for Charlie. So when Jasper begs for his help, he eagerly agrees. Jasper takes him to his secret glade in the bush, and it’s here that Charlie bears witness to Jasper’s horrible discovery – the body of young Laura Wishart. Soon, Charlie’s not only dealing with the impending collapse of his parent’s marriage, the racism directed at his Vietnamese friend, Jeffrey, and falling in love for the first time, but also Corrigan’s growing fear and suspicion. Because if Charlie doesn’t learn to sort the truth from the lies, it may just be Jasper that pays the price.

Jasper Jones has won a heap of awards and it’s been on the top 101 books list at Aus’s biggest bookstore chain for years now. It’s even been adapted into a movie and play. If you like (a) historical (b) mystery and (c) coming of age books, this is probably for you.

About the Author:

  • Craig is both a novelist and a musician – he writes for and performs in a band called The Nancy Sikes!
  • He grew up on an orchard at Dwellingup in Western Australia
  • Aside from his novels, he’s also written a children’s picture book about a guide dog.
  • His first novel, Rhubard was published when he was only 19 years old.
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Akarnae – Lynette Noni

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Arkarnae has been sitting on the kids top 51 chart for Australia’s biggest book store chain for a while now. It beat SJM and Cassie Clare. Like what? Akarnae is supposedly a mix of Narnia, Harry Potter, Percy Jackson and X-men all thrown in together. It tells the story of Alex, who walks through a doorway and somehow finds herself stuck in the fantasy world of Medora. Only a man named Professor Marselle can help her get back but oh no, he’s missing. In the meantime, Alex attends a Medoran Boarding School for kids with special abilities. However, when weird things start to occur, it becomes clear that something BAD is coming. As you can imagine, it’s up to Alex and her new friends to save the world, but what if doing so means she’ll never get home? Arkarnae is the first in a series of 5 and shock, gasp, oh my god, there is NO romance in the first few books.

About the Author:

  • Lynette has studied journalism, academic writing and human behaviour at university.
  • She loves animated movies and baking.
  • Aside from Akarnae, she’s also the author of Whisper (2018).
  • Lynette regularly takes part in writing-related panels and conducts workshops for schools.
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A Thousand Perfect Notes – C. G. Drews

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Another debut from a young Aussie author. ATPN is about a boy name Beck who’s grown up in an abusive home. Beck’s mother constantly forces him to practice the piano in the hopes that he will make up for the illustrious music career she believes she missed out on. Beck is terrified of his mother and wants nothing more than to get away. One day he’s paired for a joint school assignment with a classmate named, August – she’s free-spirited, full of life, and may just offer Beck the perfect escape from his trapped existence.

About the Author:

  • Cait is more widely known in internet blogging circles as Paperfury and is one of the most popular bookstagrammers around/reviewers on Goodreads.
  • ATPN is her debut novel and her second, The Boy who Steals Houses, is due for release in April.
  • She reads hundreds of books a year and shares my immense love of cake.

Have you read many YA books by Aussie authors? What are some of your favourites?